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Posted on April 18th, 2014, by

TABLE OF CONTENTS

  1. Instructional Unit
  2. Overview of the Instructional Unit

1.1.  The Major Instructional Goal of the Unit

1.2.  The Appropriate Audience

  1. Material List for the Instructional Unit
  2. Task Analysis (Goal Analysis)
  3. Performance Objectives for Tasks and Subtasks
  4. Seven Lesson Plans

5.1.  Lesson Plan I

5.2.  Lesson Plan II

5.3.  Lesson Plan III

5.4.  Lesson Plan IV

5.5.  Lesson Plan V

5.6.  Lesson Plan VI

5.7.  Lesson Plan VII

  1. Assessment and Evaluation Method
  2. Report on the Instructional Unit
  3. Summary of the Instructional Problem

1.1  Discussion of the Major Findings from the Needs Analysis Conducted on the Problem

1.2  Discussion of why the Determined Problem Could be Addressed with Instruction

1.3  Discussion of the Major Findings from Learner and Task Analysis Conducted on the Problem

  1. Discussion on the Instructional Unit

2.1  The Learning Theories Used

2.2  The Instructional Strategies Used

2.3  Explanation of how the Strategies, Activities and Assessments Address the Needs of Special Populations within the Instructional Audience

  1. Discussion of the Revisions Made to the Instructional Unit based on Learner Feedback or Feedback from a Content Professional and the Initial Evaluation of the Instructional Unit

3.1  How Feedback was Obtained

3.2  Description of the learner response to the Instructional Unit

3.3  The Initial Evaluation of the Instructional Unit

 

  1. References

 

 

 

 

 

 

A.        Instructional Unit

1.         Overview of the Instructional Unit

1.1.      The Major Instructional Goal of the Unit

The instructional goal of the Unit will be focused on the learners’ outcomes: The 5-th grade gifted math students will develop fluency in understanding and manipulating fractions. They will be able

  • to solve any problem connected with fractions and mixed numbers;
  • to add and subtract fractions with like denominators and unlike denominators;
  • to multiply and divide fractions;
  • to improve their skills and abilities in identifying and renaming equivalent fractions and order fractions of all types including improper fractions and mixed numbers;
  • to fluently solve real world problems which involve multiplication of fractions and mixed numbers by using visual fraction models or equations to represent the problem (Common Core Fifth-Grade Math Standards, 5. NF, 2010).

Alignment with Standards/Frameworks: the goals of the Unit are aligned with local state and national standards. These goals will help the students of the 5-th grade to develop the skills available for Common Core fifth-grade math standards.

1.2.      The Appropriate Audience: Description of Learners

Target audience for this instructional unit includes the gifted math students of the 5-th grade. The set of learners is comprised of 7 boys and 8 girls of the same age group.

Entry Behaviors:

The learners have already mastered some important skills and concepts associated with the goals of the instructional unit. They know the definition of the terms fraction, decimals and mixed numbers. In addition, the students of the 5-th grade can reduce fractions to simplest forms, convert between improper fractions and mixed numbers, add and subtract fractions with like denominators.

Prior Knowledge: The gifted students of the 5-th grade have already studied the topics: multiplication, division and mixed operations and know the major rules used in these operations. In the 3-rd grade the students developed understanding of fractions as numbers, compared two fractions, put fractions in order. In addition, in the 4-th grade they have got extend understanding of fraction equivalence and ordering. The have solved problems involving measurement and conversion of measurements from a larger unit to a smaller unit.

Attitudes toward Content: The learners have positive attitude towards the topic of the instructional unit. They express interest in new assignments and take an active part in math games.

Academic Motivation: The students are motivated to learn the content proposed in the instructional unit. Most of the students have a great desire to become economists and bankers. That is why they pay special attention to math classes. In addition, practically all of them work toward getting high grades in math.

Education and Ability: The learners of the group under study are gifted students. They have already demonstrated their intellectual skills and abilities in the study of other topics (addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, etc.), when they were in the 3-rd and 4-th grades. The majority of the students in the group had got high grades in testing. They demonstrated high level of logical reasoning.

Group Characteristics: The learners of the group have practically the same level of heterogeneity. The majority of students are active, quick in the uptake, and intelligent.

2.         Material List for the Instructional Unit

This instructional unit requires the use of the following materials: math books, pencils, paper, colored markers, 30 colored cards with fractions, online programs.

3.         Task Analysis (Goal Analysis)

Upon the completion of the unit, the learners will be able to develop fluency with addition and subtraction of fractions, and developing understanding of the multiplication of fractions and of division of fractions (5.NF). The following performance tasks will be included in the instructional unit: math message, equivalent fraction exploration, equivalent fraction rules of multiplication and division, rules of addition and subtraction of fractions, the use of visual fraction models (equations) to represent a problem.

4.         Performance Objectives for Tasks and Subtasks

The students will be able to review equivalent fractions and use equivalent fractions as a strategy for addition and subtraction of fractions, add and subtract fractions with unlike denominators, including mixed numbers, explore fraction addition and subtraction, compare and order fractions, use fraction sticks to formulate multiplication and division rules, mental math tests.

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